Re-Awaking Ancient Salish Sea Basketry is now out and covers Northwest Coast wet site work and research for 50 years

cover 2-12-18

Re-Awakening Ancient Salish Sea Basketry: Fifty Years of Basketry Studies in Culture and Science traces the evolution of traditional basketmaking on the Northwest Coast of North America from thousands of years ago to contemporary times and is now available worldwide on: Amazon

The book is the result of a collaboration between Mr. Ed Carriere, Suquamish Elder and Master Basketmaker, and Dr. Dale Croes, Northwest archaeologist specializing in ancient basketry and excavation of Northwest Coast waterlogged sites (also known as “wet sites”). Both men have spent over 50 years of their lives exploring their mutual interest in the art of basketry. Re-Awakening Ancient Salish Sea Basketry explores the lives of these two basketry specialists; describes their analyses of the 2,000-year-old basketry collection from the Biderbost wet-site, Snoqualmie Tribal Territory, currently housed at the University of Washington Burke Museum Archaeology Program; describes their development of Generationally-Linked Archaeology, a new approach that connects contemporary cultural specialists with ancient and ancestral specialists through collaboration with archaeologists; and details the sharing of their efforts with cultural audiences, such as the Northwest Native American Basketweavers Association, and scientific audiences, such as the annual Northwest Anthropological Conference.

The book concludes with the authors’ reflection on the contributions that ancient sites and artifacts can make to community cultural perpetuation efforts.

A great short video of Ed Carriere making his traditional clam baskets can be seen on his Author’s Page: Ed Carriere

Ed's Archaeology Basket with Time Periods_reduced

Ed Carriere, Suquamish Elder and Master Basketmaker, and Dale Croes, Wet Site Archaeologist Featured in Suquamish News

Ed Carriere and my trip to the 30th Anniversary of the Wetland Archaeology Research Project (WARP) Conference was featured in his Suquamish Tribal Newspaper, pages 5-6:  Suquamish News, page 5-6 WARP30 .  Their news paper has many other articles you may find interesting too.

Ed truly enjoyed the conference, hearing all the papers and meeting everyone.  We look forward to sharing our work together in the future.

6-29-16  Ed showing our work at WARP30
Ed Carriere showing WARP30 delegates his replication of ancient wet site basketry work at the anniversary conference

NEW BOOK Available here: Comparative Anatomy of Branches, Roots and Wood of Some North American Dicotyledonous and Coniferous Trees and Woody Shrubs Used in Ethnographic Artifacts : Identification and Conservation Concerns

by Mary-Lou E. Florian

Mary-Lou Florian,  Emerita Conservation Scientist, Royal British Columbia Museum, Victoria, B.C. Canada, has generous provided us a link to the chapter’s of her important and well illustrated new contribution: her lifetime work on plant identification with a study of comparative anatomy and conservation concerns for wet/wetland site and ethnographic wood and fiber artifacts.

The book deals with the comparative anatomy of the tissues of the bark, phloem, heartwood, sapwood, and pith in wood, branches, and roots of woody shrubs, hardwood trees and softwood coniferous trees, that were reported to be used historically in making ethnographic and archaeological artifacts. The species researched in this book are endemic to Northwest Coast of North America. The species used in the following chapters have anatomical characteristics that are also common in other genera in the same family. Even though the book is on species in the NW Coast of Canada , the information is applicable to tree genera in similar latitudinal environments in Canada, USA, Europe and Asia.

Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) branch bark cross section
Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) branch bark cross section

I am pleased we can almost immediately provide this new release to NewsWARP researchers throughout the world and make sure Mary-Lou’s monumental work can be used to assist with plant identification and conservation work that is so important and fundamental to wet/wetland artifact research.

You can download chapters of the entire book at this web site:  Comparative Anatomy of Branches, Roots, and Wood….

Scroll down and click on menu “Download” to find all the chapters.

transverse surface of hemlock heartwood showing at a growth ring a gradual  change of large, thin walled, early wood cells -upward- to shorter cells with thick walls to form late wood
Transverse surface of hemlock heartwood, showing at a growth ring, a gradual change of large, thin walled, early wood cells -upward- to shorter cells with thick walls to form late wood

Ozette: Excavating a Makah Whaling Village By Ruth Kirk


NEW BOOK:  Ozette: Excavating a Makah Whaling Village

By Ruth Kirk, Author

The first comprehensive book on the history and research at the Ozette Village site investigations is now released.  Author Ruth Kirk does an excellent job synthesizing all the details of the field work, discovery of preserved wet site houses under a mudslide, developing the fieldwork strategies and logistics for year-round operations and the considerable research accomplished concerning this massive Northwest Coast of North America wet site undertaking.  A must read to understand the work done on this major wet site.

Here are some of the comments about this book:

UW Press: Ruth Kirk was present, documenting the archaeological work from its beginning, and her firsthand knowledge of the people and efforts involved enrich her compelling story of discovery, fieldwork, and deepen our understanding of Makah cultural heritage.

Ozette WhaleAnything Ruth Kirk writes I will devoutly read, and to have her paired with the dramatic story of the Ozette dig is a decided pleasure. No writer is more qualified, nor more dedicated, to the telling of this enticing archeological tale. – Ivan Doig, author of Winter Brothers

Makahs worked with ‘Doc’ Daugherty and Ruth Kirk for more than 45 years and we have been greatly anticipating the completion this book. As Makahs, we know the beauty and strength of Ozette and now the rest of the world can too! – Janine Ledford, Executive Director, Makah Cultural and Research Center

11_005   11_011This book is an inspiration, just like ‘Doc’ Daugherty and his crew inspired us all at the Ozette Village site. We will never understand our future until we better understand the past and Ozette helps us do just that.
Ralph Munro, Washington Secretary of State 1980-2001

Ozette: Excavating a Makah Whaling Village will be highly popular among both professionals in anthropology and members of the interested public. This truly is one of her best writings and a synthesis as only Ruth Kirk could write. – Dale R. Croes, Ph.D., Washington State University and Director of the Pacific Northwest Archaeological Society


Google this title and obtain a copy through internet services.  Great to see this general synthesis of a major wet site undertaking.

CALL FOR Wetland Papers: WAC-8; Kyoto, Japan August 28th–Sept 2nd, 2016


WETLAND SESSION TITLE: Multiproxy Wetland and Lakeside Archaeology: From Constructed Niches to the Anthropocene

Organiser(s): Tony Brown (University of Southampton / UK), Naoto Yamamoto (Nagoya University / Japan) and Hidetaka Bessho (Higashiosaka City Cultural Foundation / Japan)

Type: Symposium


Website link:

Deadline for paper submission; end of February 2016

Abstract: Archaeological sites in wetlands and lake environments have revealed remarkable aspects of the human past that are out of reach of typical dry-land archaeology. The increasing sophistication of palaeoecological methods from biomarkers to aDNA is also producing remarkable data on human activities from lakes and wetland sites. These environmental archives can also record in unparalleled detail the slow and non-linear transition from human co-habited niches to the ecological dominance that characterises the Anthropocene. Whilst the excavation of wetland sites started in NW Europe, especially on the famous lake villages of Switzerland, it has now expanded worldwide to southern Europe, North America, and even Africa. One of the geographical areas of greatest potential is SE Asia including Japan, where excavations of Jomon sites have revealed both remarkable, but also important, details of past human lives and their relationship to changing environmental conditions. Because of the exceptional importance of environmental data to wetland archaeology its study has always been closely related to palaeoecology and this session will exploit this Ecology-Archaeology synergy. In this session, jointly convened by European and Japanese environmental archaeologists we will address how studies of wetland sites (wetlands and lakes) can contribute to studies of Holocene hunter gatherer lifestyles including plant and animal husbandry, to the history of agriculture worldwide and the relative importance of environmental change at a variety of scales from the short-lived and local ‘events’ to global trends.

Dear Committee. I hope this session will bring together European, American and Japanese archaeologists all interested in the use of palaeoecological and environmental data from wet sites. We aim to go far beyond traditional notions of palaeodiet and life-ways through nutritional analyses, aDNA and modelling.

Keywords: wetlands, lakes, Jomon, palaeodiet, nutrition